Weekly Photo Challenge: Dense

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If you look close (or maybe not so closely) at the top of the very dense forest, you can see the tower of the Ehrenberg Castle ruin. Below is a picture of the full castle, so you can tell just how dense the forest is when looking at it from the foot of the hill where it dwells.

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For more from this challenge, visit the Daily Press’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Dense.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Two Materials

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My husband is a structural engineer, so we visit construction sites frequently. It’s a lot of fun taking pictures of something that started out as an idea on paper and then becomes reality. This photo is the garage of a very large custom home. The combination of steel and wood provides a great visual contrast. Mixing and matching materials can give your images a lot of interest.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) THAT FEATURE MORE THAN ONE MATERIAL.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Texture

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We usually think of texture as a tangible, touchable thing, but it is so important when creating images. When shooting babies, I like to include textured blankets and wraps to enhanced the look of the that baby-smooth skin. The face of an oder person with lots of wrinkles gives character and backstory to a simple portrait. The textures found in nature provide light and shadow contrast, as in my closeup of the red rock in southern Utah.

You can also add texture to an image in post production by increasing clarity or sharpness. Many programs have ready-made texturing settings to add canvass or film textures to your image. So whether you are going for a native texture (the image just came that way) or enhanced texture (added post-production), let’s see what you’ve got!

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE ONE OR TWO OR MORE PHOTOS WITH NATIVE OR ADDED TEXTURE.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Texture

Texture makes our world interesting. Some things are smooth while others are bumpy or have sharp edges or prickly surfaces.

For this week’s challenge, I’ve found two pictures with very different textures. The first is a plain brick wall. As a background, we might notice it a little bit, depending on what the main subject of our image is or is doing. As the main subject itself, we begin to notice individuality in each brick. One may be missing a corner, while another has interesting striations on it, and another might be a darker or lighter shade of color than its neighbors.

BricksFor my second photo, I’ve picked a particularly popular photo spot in Coyote Gulch near Escalante in Southern Utah. This waterfall has been photographed by hundreds or possibly thousands of people. The first time I saw a photo of it, I wondered if the rock was hard or soft silt. It’s hard, though it has a creamy look to it, especially through the texture of the water.

Coyote Gulch waterfall

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO THAT ARE HAVE A UNIQUE TEXTURE OF SOME KIND.

Have fun experimenting with all sorts of textures found in nature or your closet.  Then blog them and post a link to your masterpieces here.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.