A Photo a Week Challenge: Flower

Yesterday was the first day of summer, and we’ve been enjoying spring so much. This spring has been especially amazing for our roses. We have several bushes, and they have all produced amazing blossoms. My favorite is our yellow rose bush. We almost lost it a few years ago during a very harsh winter, but I’m happy to report that it has roar back wonderfully.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO FEATURING FLOWERS OF ANY KIND.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.
Advertisements

A Photo a Week Challenge: Nostalgia

nostalgia_nmp

So I seem to be stuck on a theme. Last week the challenge focused on endings. This week it is nostalgia. Memories are powerful things. And the way our brains store and retrieve memories means that they aren’t always exactly accurate. Since the invention and wide-spread use of photography, we are able to capture moments and memories in a way that could never have been dreamed of just 200 years ago. This photo is my mom’s lilacs. The house I grew up in had several lilac bushes. Light lavender, deep purple, white. So many colors lining the back wall of our home. When my parent’s moved, the new house didn’t have lilacs, and my mom missed them very much. When it came time for my folks to leave large houses and move into a condo, my mom insisted on a lilac bush. The community my parents moved to allows the residents a bit of autonomy when it comes to plants around their unit, so she got her wish. Every time I walk by lilacs, my mind is flooded with memories of my childhood home.

These words from a song the children at my church love to sing pretty much sums it up for me:

Whenever I hear the song of a bird
Or look at the blue, blue sky,
Whenever I feel the rain on my face
Or the wind as it rushes by,
Whenever I touch a velvet rose
Or walk by our lilac tree,
I’m glad that I live in this beautiful world
Heavenly Father created for me.
(My Heavenly Father Loves Me, words and music by Clara W. McMaster)

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) THAT SHOW ENDINGS OF ANY KIND.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Raindrops

rain_nmp

Spring in Utah is an interesting thing. In April, the weather varied between temperatures in the 60s and 70s to snow. The mountains surrounding the Salt Lake Valley are still covered in snow, and the last week we have had more rain than we usually see the entire month of May. But that might mean that we won’t have another rainstorm until July. That’s just the way it goes.

With the rain yesterday, I had fun capturing the raindrops on my tulips. Rain can be tricky to photograph, but raindrops on objects are a lot of fun. They give things a fresh feeling.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) FEATURING RAINDROPS.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: The Rule of Thirds

rule_of_thirds_nmp

The rule of thirds is a standard photographers use to frame their images. You divide the frame into a grid of three across and three down, and then don’t put your subject in the middle square. It’s also best if you can put the focus of your image on one of the grid lines. Just like any really good rule, it’s also fun when you know when to break it. However, for this photo, I didn’t.

For anyone who needs it, here’s a grid for reference. If you want to do portrait orientation, just flip it.

rule_of_thirds_graph

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) USING THE RULE OF THIRDS.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

 

Trevor Carpenter PhotoChallenge: Nature Macro

week13_2019_nature_macro_nmp

For more from this challenge, visit the Trevor Carpenter PhotoChallenge: Nature Macro.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Meme-worthy Photos

meme_worthy_nmp

My Facebook feed is always filled with memes. Most use quotes from religious or government leaders. And even though I’ve been know to make a few memes myself, I’m usually more interested in the photo than the words. What made them choose that photo? Did they take the photo themselves or grab it off the internet? I like to use my own photos (saves a lot of heartburn over copyright infringement risks). So here are a few photos I’ve used for memes and an example of a meme, just in case you are wondering what the heck this is about.

meme_worthy_nmp3

meme_worthy_nmp4

meme_worthy_nmp5

meme_worthy_nmp2

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) THAT WOULD MAKE A GREAT MEME BACKGROUND.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Depth of Field

depth_of_field_nmp

Depth of field in photography (and light in general) is how narrow a strip of what you are looking at is in focus. In photography, the depth of field is controlled by two things: your f-stop (aperture) and the length of your lens (mm). To narrow your depth of field using aperture, use a smaller f-stop number. This will open your shutter wider and let more light in. I know this seems counter-intuitive, but that’s how the light refracts. Also, longer lenses (50 mm and higher are so much fun for portrait work) will give you a narrower depth of field. So if you want to shoot something up-close and personal with great bokeh (blurring) in the background, use a smaller f-stop and a longer lens. If you want to capture a grand landscape, use a shorter lens with a higher f-stop. Simple, right? Right.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR THREE…) PAYING ATTENTION TO YOUR DEPTH OF FIELD.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography. Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ and “Photo a Week” tags.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.