Trevor Carpenter PhotoChallenge: Nature Macro

week13_2019_nature_macro_nmp

For more from this challenge, visit the Trevor Carpenter PhotoChallenge: Nature Macro.

Advertisements

A Photo a Week Challenge: Meme-worthy Photos

meme_worthy_nmp

My Facebook feed is always filled with memes. Most use quotes from religious or government leaders. And even though I’ve been know to make a few memes myself, I’m usually more interested in the photo than the words. What made them choose that photo? Did they take the photo themselves or grab it off the internet? I like to use my own photos (saves a lot of heartburn over copyright infringement risks). So here are a few photos I’ve used for memes and an example of a meme, just in case you are wondering what the heck this is about.

meme_worthy_nmp3

meme_worthy_nmp4

meme_worthy_nmp5

meme_worthy_nmp2

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR MORE) THAT WOULD MAKE A GREAT MEME BACKGROUND.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Depth of Field

depth_of_field_nmp

Depth of field in photography (and light in general) is how narrow a strip of what you are looking at is in focus. In photography, the depth of field is controlled by two things: your f-stop (aperture) and the length of your lens (mm). To narrow your depth of field using aperture, use a smaller f-stop number. This will open your shutter wider and let more light in. I know this seems counter-intuitive, but that’s how the light refracts. Also, longer lenses (50 mm and higher are so much fun for portrait work) will give you a narrower depth of field. So if you want to shoot something up-close and personal with great bokeh (blurring) in the background, use a smaller f-stop and a longer lens. If you want to capture a grand landscape, use a shorter lens with a higher f-stop. Simple, right? Right.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO (OR THREE…) PAYING ATTENTION TO YOUR DEPTH OF FIELD.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography. Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ and “Photo a Week” tags.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: State of Confusion

state_confusion_nmp

Spring in Utah is like living in a state of confusion. Each year, the fruit farmers live in constant dread of late spring snowstorms and hard freezes that could wipe out their entire crop. The day after my tulips opened, we had a crazy snowstorm that blanketed our garden with about an inch of snow. Fortunately, the next day the temperature was in the 50s and the snow melted. At least we don’t have to water the gardens yet.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE PHOTOS THAT FEATURE CHAOS OR CONFUSION.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ and “Photo a Week” tags.
  3. Come back here and post a link to your image in the comments for this challenge.
  4. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Off-Center

offcenter_nmp

PSA: This challenge is for last week and this week. Normal posting dates will resume on August 10. Thank you.

One of the cardinal rules of photography is to not place your main subject in the middle of your frame. It’s all part of that asymmetry stuff that you learned in high school art classes. If you’ve found a photo with a dead-centered subject that you love, but it doesn’t look quite right, try cropping it with your subject off-centered and see if you like it more. The beauty with digital is that you can try several different cropped to see what looks the best and even ask family, friends, or perfect strangers which they like the most.

IN A NEW POST CREATED FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO WITH THE SUBJECT OFF-CENTER.

Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Each week, I’ll come up with a theme and post a photo that I think fits. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Thursday, when the next photo theme will be announced.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “A Photo a Week Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.
  3. Follow nancy merrill photography so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements.